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(@flyingmoose)
Noble Member

Below are the known and published guidelines for various parks in the Northern Virginia Region. If there are any additions or changes just post a new topic and one of the Admin will add to this master list. Thanks!

Parks covered below:
Bull Run Mountains Conservancy
Fairfax County Park Authority
Nature Conservancy
Prince William County Park Authority
Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority

Bull Run Mountains Conservancy Geocaching Policy-----------------------

Virginia Outdoors Foundation (VOF) is the landowner and manager of the Bull Run Mountains Natural Area Preserve (BRMNAP). VOF leases 800 acres of the southern portion of BRMNAP to Bull Run Mountains Conservancy, (BRMC). BRMC provides visitor management services. BRMC and VOF have established the following geocaching guidelines to assure good stewardship of the natural, cultural, and historical resources on the preserve.

Geocaches may be placed on the 800-acre public preserve as long as they adhere to the following guidelines:

1. BEFORE placing a cache, you must notify BRMC to determine the location of the cache.

2. Caches must be located on our marked trails and accessible by our marked trails. The intent of this and other guidelines is to protect the preserve's natural, cultural, and historical resources. Trails are a disturbance in natural ecosystems. Any additional disturbance by going off trail can increase the†dispersal of invasive plants, cause damage to underlying vegetation, and disturb wildlife. From the protection of cultural and natural resources perspective, BRMC and VOF do NOT authorize people†to go†off trail. Established trails within the preserve are usually sited far enough away from sensitive resources in order to protect them -- going off trail encourages users to go into the sensitive resource areas.

3. Caches must be placed no more than 3 feet from the marked trails.

4. Caches must be within the 800-acre public access boundary.

5. Geocaches shall be a minimum of 50’ from private property.

6. The 800-acre preserve can accommodate a limited amount of geocaches to be determined by BRMC and VOF.

7. The movement of already downed leaves, twigs and pieces of bark to conceal geocaches is allowed. BRMC prohibits the movement of rocks to make a cairn, removing bark from a tree to use as camouflage, and/or relocating a living plant. It is prohibited to excavate soils, cut vegetation, move or remove archaeological or natural objects (including living plants, animals, minerals, fungi, archaeological artifacts or features, etc.).

8. Geocaches shall not be attached to any living or non-living natural resources in such a way that there is any possible damage to the resource. Loosely attached containers that do not restrict growth or cause damage to the resource may be used. Any attachments such as string, twine, wire, or tie wraps that cinch tightly to the resource are prohibited.

9. Geocaches shall not be attached to any man-made park amenities in such a manner as to damage the object or to impede its proper usage, the physical placement or attachment of caches to any buildings, sheds, regulatory signs or informational signs is prohibited. The use of data printed on the signs as offsets for coordinates is allowed. Alteration of the sign in any way is prohibited.

10. Geocachers must abide by all visitor-use guidelines for the preserve as posted by BRMC. This includes access hours of sunrise to sunset, no dogs, no horses, no climbing, no motorized vehicles, etc. See the list of visitor-use guidelines at http://www.brmconservancy.org .

11. Caches placed on the preserve land without permission are subject to removal without notice.

Geocaching Approval Process

Before placing a geocache on the 800-acre public preserve, you must obtain approval from Bull Run Mountains Conservancy. BRMC will work with the cache owner to find an appropriate location for the cache that meets all of our guidelines.

Contact Bull Run Mountains Conservancy at:

Bull Run Mountains Conservancy
P.O. Box 210
Broad Run, Virginia 20137

Phone: (703)753-2631
Email: info@brmconservancy.org

Website: http://www.brmconservancy.org

Policy adopted on: May 1, 2009

Fairfax County Park Authority Geocaching Policy-----------------------

Geocaching, letterboxing, and other similar activities are allowed in many Park Authority parks. Guidelines have been established to assure good stewardship of the natural and cultural resources in the parks.

Download the approved list of parks where geocaching, letterboxing, and other similar activities are allowed. If a park is not on this list, geocaching is not allowed unless written permission from the Park Authority has been given. The typical reasons for not allowing a cache are safety or good stewardship – lack of trails or parking, sensitive natural or cultural resources, nearby schools, size of the park or the park’s topography.

Geocaches may be placed in one of the approved parks as long as they adhere to the following guidelines: Guidelines

As with any activity on parkland, the Park Authority reserves the right to place reasonable restrictions on the time, manner or place in which an activity is conducted. Although most park visitors value parkland and resources, there have been many instances where individuals left private property on parkland as part of illicit activities and there are frequently unauthorized uses on parkland that could pose a threat to public safety, or damage property and/or cultural or natural resources. For these reasons, the Park Authority needs to regulate all activities on parkland.

* Geocaches shall only be located in developed park areas that have existing uses, trails and established access points. Geocaches shall not be placed more than 25 feet away from a maintained trail or developed area in a park.
o Developed areas may include parking lots, roadways, athletic fields, tennis courts, picnic areas, etc.
o Established/Maintained trails are typically asphalt, concrete, or gravel and are usually maintained six to ten feet wide. Casual (beaten footpaths) or wildlife trails are not considered maintained trails.

The Park Authority is most concerned with trails that are not in the right place in the landscape -- e.g. go directly up a slope as opposed to across a slope, are on the banks of a stream as opposed to further away, trails that show obvious signs of flooding and abuse (e.g. a 4 foot trail that widens to 8 feet due to a wet spot isn't a good trail).

A general rule of thumb for defining an established trail is: Would a really determined geocacher be able to get a trail-use stroller to the site (and no cheating by lifting it up and walking over non-staired sections of the trail)? If the trail being considered meets this test, it meets the intent of the guideline.

The intent of this and other guidelines is to protect the park’s natural and cultural resources. Trails are a disturbance in natural ecosystems. Any additional disturbance by going off trail can increase the dispersal of invasive plants, cause damage to underlying vegetation, and disturb wildlife. From the protection of cultural and natural resources perspective, the Park Authority generally does not authorize people to go off trail. Established trails within the parks are usually sited far enough away from sensitive resources in order to protect them -- going off trail encourages users to go into the sensitive resource areas.

* Geocaches shall be a minimum of 50’ from private property.
* Geocache locations must be accessible from a safe and legal parking location whether that is along a public street or within a public parking area. If not readily evident, cache owners should include recommended parking directions on their cache page.
* The movement of already downed leaves, twigs and pieces of bark to conceal geocaches is allowed. The Park Authority prohibits the movement of rocks to make a cairn, removing bark from a tree to use as camouflage, and/or relocating a living plant. It is prohibited to excavate soils, cut vegetation, move or remove archaeological or natural objects (including living plants, animals, minerals, fungi, archaeological artifacts or features, etc.). Human-made objects of non-archaeological significance (e.g. a plastic water bottle) are considered trash and may be removed without prior notice to (or permission from) the Park Authority.
* Geocaches shall not be attached to any living or non-living natural resources in such a way that there is any possible damage to the resource. Loosely attached containers that do not restrict growth or cause damage to the resource may be used. Any attachments such as string, twine, wire, or tie wraps that cinch tightly to the resource are prohibited.
* Geocaches shall not be attached to any man-made park amenities in such a manner as to damage the object or to impede its proper usage, the physical placement or attachment of caches to any buildings, sheds, regulatory signs or informational signs is prohibited. The use of data printed on the signs as offsets for coordinates is allowed. Alteration of the sign in any way is prohibited.
* Geocachers must abide by all Park Authority rules, regulations, and other restrictions. This specifically includes park access times. Unless posted otherwise, all Park Authority parks are open from Dawn to Dusk. Night Caching in Park Authority parks is expressly forbidden. Cache Owners should include wording stating the acceptable caching hours, etc. in their cache pages.
* Caches shall only be placed in safe locations not unduly causing patron risk. Geocachers must review the topography of the location where the cache is to be placed and the potential safety risks to the patrons trying to find the cache.
* Geocachers must strive to cause no damage to the ground or vegetation that may result from cache searchers accessing the location. If damage is noted, the geocacher must contact the Park Authority for further information.
* As with all activities on park land, the geocacher assumes some risk in undertaking their activity. The Park Authority is in no way responsible for any damage to or loss of caches or equipment that is caused by others. Park Authority reserves the right to have cache owners or Park Authority staff remove any non-compliant caches. The Park Authority will remove and dispose of all unauthorized caches if unable to contact the owner of the cache to remove it themselves.
* Caches placed on Park Authority land without written permission prior to March 2008 are subject to review and may be removed if they are found to be non-compliant with Park Authority Guidelines.

Geocaching Approval Process

The Park Authority grants blanket permission for the placement of geocaches within the Fairfax County Parks specifically named in the approved list of parks. Even though blanket permission is being granted, all geocaches must be placed in accordance with Park Authority guidelines (see above). The placement of geocaches that are not in compliance with Park Authority guidelines are prohibited.

If a specific park is not listed on the approved list of parks, geocache placement is prohibited in that park unless written permission has been given. One or more of the following reasons are why a park may not be listed as an approved site:

* Lack of developed areas within the park, to include the lack of established/maintained trails.
* Lack of available safe and legal parking in reasonably close proximity to the park.
* The presence of cultural and natural resources that precludes the use of the park for this type of activity.
* The park’s proximity to a public school or public safety facility.
* The size of the park and the proximity of the surrounding residential properties precludes the use of a park for this activity.
* The general topography of the park makes it potentially unsafe for geocachers and/or use of the site for this type of activity is likely to lead to damage occurring to the ground or vegetation.

Exceptions to Approved List of Parks

Geocache placement needs at parks that are not contained in the approved list of parks must be individually approved by the Park Authority. The Park Authority will attempt to respond to requests for exceptions within 30 days.

Nature Conservancy Geocaching Guidelines-----------------------

The rules are as follows:
In order to get a site approved the following guidelines must be met:
1. All caches should be placed on, or in close proximity to, the existing trails so as not to endanger the natural habitat. This would be interpreted to mean no caches further than 3 meters away from existing blazed trails.
2. The cache owner will visit the locations on a regular basis to maintain the caches and to assess the impact on the environment.
3. If any problems should occur, the caches will be disabled and removed at our request.
4. The cache owner will provide cache descriptions so we can review what will be posted on the listing web site(s). Also, after the site is up and running, we would need links to all the listing web site pages with the listings on them.
5. Cache pages should have Nature Preserve Guidelines included on them. The guidelines follow:

Preserve Visitation Guidelines

Nature Conservancy preserves are private properties. They are managed to protect fragile resources--native species and plant communities.

You will find few facilities. The trails we do maintain or create are designed to steer visitors away from the most fragile portions of the preserve and toward those areas that can handle more use. Still, we ask you to tread lightly.

Many of the state's preserves are open to visitors, but only for low-impact recreational activities (see list below). Those preserves harboring species or natural communities at risk, however, are not open to the public.

Preparation: the Key to a Safe, Enjoyable Visit
We ask you to prepare for your visit and take proper precautions while on site.

* Wear comfortable footwear suitable for hiking, but please do not wear heavy, cleated boots - these damage the trails.
* To protect yourself from ticks, poison ivy or poison sumac, wear long pants - and tuck them into your socks.
* No matter which season of the year it is, each person in your party should bring a full water bottle. Dehydration is a serious risk at any time of the year.

Preparation: What to Bring
To get the most from your visit, and to protect yourself from the elements, you may want to include the following items in your backpack:

* Binoculars
* Camera
* Compass
* Field guides (to wildflowers, birds, butterflies and other natural features)
* Insect repellant
* Rain gear
* Snack (fruit or trail mix)
* Sunscreen

What You Can Do
The following activities are permitted on Conservancy preserves:

* Birdwatching
* Hiking
* Nature Study
* Photography
* Boating (in some cases)

What You Cannot Do
The following activities are not permitted on Conservancy preserves:

* Biking
* Camping
* Caving
* Driving an ATV or off-road vehicle
* Cooking or camp fires
* Fishing or trapping
* Horseback riding
* Hunting
* Littering
* Pets
* Picking flowers, berries, nuts or mushrooms
* Removing any part of the natural landscape (shells, rocks, etc.)
* Rock climbing
* Swimming

Respect Our Neighbors' Property
Please do not trespass on private property adjacent to Conservancy preserves. Property lines are clearly marked with small yellow signs featuring the Conservancy's logo.

Contact Us
For more information, please contact our State Office:
490 Westfield Road
Charlottesville, VA 22901
(434) 295-6106
open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

******************End Text

Requests should be made to Tim SanJule at

tsanjule[at]tnc(dot)org

Blackwater River
Bottom Creek Gorge
Cumberland Marsh
Dragon Run
Falls Ridge
Fernbrook Natural Area
Fortune's Cove
Fraser
New Point Comfort
North Landing River
Northwest River
Piney Grove
Warm Springs Mountain
Wildcat Mountain Natural Area
http://www.nature.org/wherewework/north ... preserves/

Prince William County Park Authority-----------------------

As you may or may not know. Recently, the responsibility of approving geocaches moved from development side of PWCPA, to the Ranger side. As such, there will be a more proactive approach to tracking geocaches within Prince William County Parks. They will be doing a reevaluation of all geocaches that they haven't recently approved. This may result in the need to move or archive caches based on placement. Owners that don't respond to their requests to geocache placement information (even if you have done them before), will ultimately have their geocaches archived. The Ranger staff will actually visit the specific location to verify that it's appropriate for a geocache BEFORE you place the geocache. If you have a geocache currently or plan to have a geocache in a Prince William County Park, please do your best to contact them with the following information (before they contact you if you already have a cache placed within their parks):

Contact:

Eric Wysocki
Senior Ranger
Department of Parks and Recreation
Prince William County, VA
571-921-6354
ewysocki@pwcgov.org

Email Ranger Wysocki with the following cache information:
Complete contact information:

* Name & (geocaching name)
* Address
* Phone Number
* where the cache will be placed (specifically with coordinates and hide description)
* original contents
* container's description
* picture's of the container(s) and cache location(s)
* any other info that will help the rangers not be alarmed

These are a compilation of the new rules that I currently have:

PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY PARK AUTHORITY
Ranger Division
February 2010
Recommended By:
Michael K. Johnson Date Chief Park Ranger
Approved By:
Tracy Hannigan Date Recreation Services Director

I. Introduction:
Geocaching is a high-tech treasure hunting game played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with GPS devices. The basic idea is to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, outdoors and then share your experiences online. Geocaching is enjoyed by people from all age groups with a strong sense of community and support for the environment. It has been the unwritten policy of the Prince William County Park Authority (PA) to allow the placement of geocaches in many of the PA's 68 park properties.
The following policy statement will serve to codify the relationship between the PA and individuals who may wish to participate in this growing sport within PA parks.

II. Definitions:
The following provides a list of commonly used geocaching terms, with their commonly accepted definition:
• Geocache - a container hidden that includes, at minimum, a logbook for geocachers to sign;
• Micro Cache — smaller containers usually only containing a log book;
• Cache - a shortened version of the word geocache;
• GPS - stands for "Global Positioning System." It is a system of satellites that work with a GPS receiver to determine your location on the planet;
• Letterboxing - is similar to geocaching, but utilizes a series of clues to find a container. Once the container (or letterbox) is found, the finder uses a carved stamp from the box, to stamp their personal logbook and return that stamp to the letterbox. The finder also uses their personal carved stamp to stamp the letterbox's logbook;
• Traditional Cache - this is one of several cache types. This is the original cache type consisting of, at a bare minimum, a container and a logbook. Normally you will find a clear container or ammo box containing items for trade. Smaller containers, called micro caches are usually too small to contain anything except for a logbook. The coordinates listed on the traditional cache page are the exact location for the cache.

III. Policy:
Geocaching, letterboxing, and other similar activities are allowed in many PA parks, and these guidelines have been established to ensure good stewardship of the natural and cultural resources of the parks.
• The PA reserves the right to place reasonable restrictions on the time, manner, or place in which a geocache activity is conducted;
• Geocaches may be located in any park area with prior approval. Use of undeveloped areas is not recommended and is done so at the geocachers own risk;
• Requests to place a geocache, letterbox, etc. on PA property must be done in writing and sent to the Chief Park Ranger at 14420 Bristow Road, Manassas, Virginia 20112, or by email through the PA's website. All requests must include:
o the name, address, and phone number of the cache owner;
o the email address of the cache owner;
o the exact proposed location of the cache to include: coordinates and a physical description (photographs are helpfuul) of the location;
o the web address of where the cache will be advertized;
o the expected length of time the cache will remain in the park;
• Geocaches shall be located a minimum of 50' from private property;
• Geocache locations must be accessible from a safe and legal parking location whether
that is along a public street or within a public parking area. If not readily evident, cache
owners should include recommended parking directions on their cache web page;
• The movement of already downed leaves, twigs, and pieces of bark to conceal geocaches
is allowed;
• . The PA prohibits:
o the movement of rocks to make a cairn,
o removing bark from a tree to use as camouflage, o relocating a living plant.
• The PA also prohibits:
o excavating soils;
o cutting vegetation;
o moving or removing archaeological or natural objects, including living plants, animals, minerals, fungi, archaeological artifacts or features, etc.
• Human-made objects of non-archaeological significance (e.g. a plastic water bottle) are considered trash and may be removed without prior notice to (or permission from) the PA;
• Geocaches shall not be attached to any living or non-living natural resources in such a way that there is any possible damage to the resource. Loosely attached containers that do not restrict growth or cause damage to the resource may be used. Any attachments such as string, twine, wire, or tie wraps that cinch tightly to the resource are prohibited;
• Geocaches shall not be attached to any man-made park amenities in such a manner as to damage the object or to impede its proper usage, the physical placement or attachment of caches to any buildings, sheds, regulatory signs, or informational signs are prohibited.
• Geocachers must abide by all PA rules, regulations, and other restrictions, including, but not limited to:
o Park access times - unless posted otherwise, all PA parks are open from sunrise to sunset. Night caching in PA parks is expressly forbidden. Cache owners should include wording stating the acceptable caching hours, etc. in their cache web
page.
o Park closures — access to any PA park closed for weather (snow, ice, etc.), emergencies, or for the season is prohibited.
• Caches shall only be placed in safe locations that will not unduly cause patron risk. Geocachers must review the topography of the location, where the cache is to be placed, and the potential safety risks to the geocachers/patrons trying to find the cache;
• All geocaches must be marked as such on the container;
• Surplus ammunition cans are not encouraged. They must be clearly marked on the outside identifying it as a geocache with contact information on the outside ;
• As with all activities on park land, the geocacher assumes some risk in undertaking their activity. The PA is in no way responsible for any damage to, or loss of, caches or equipment that is caused by others.
• The PA reserves the right to have cache owners remove any non-compliant caches at any time;
• The PA will remove and dispose of all unauthorized caches if unable to contact the owner of the cache to remove it themselves;
• The PA may deny a request for any of the following reasons
o Lack of developed areas within the park, to include the lack of established/maintained trails;
o Lack of available safe and legal parking in reasonably close proximity to the park o The presence of cultural and natural resources that precludes the use of the park for this type of activity;
o The park's proximity to a public school or public safety facility;
o The size of the park and the proximity of the surrounding residential properties preclude the use of a park for this activity;
o The general topography of the park that makes it potentially unsafe for geocachers and/or use of the site for this type of activity is likely to lead to damage occurring to the ground, vegetation, or other PA resources;
o Interference with other PA programs, activities, etc.;
o Any other reason not listed above for which the PA determines the placement will interfere with the management of the PA.
• Caches owners must notify the Chief Park Ranger when they remove an approved cache.
IV. Conclusion:
The placement of geocaches, letterboxes, etc. on Park Authority property is an acceptable activity for PA patrons to be involved in. However, certain types of placements can be problematic. Caches might be hidden in places where the act of searching can make a finder look suspicious (e.g. skulking near schools, children's playgrounds, secluded park areas, etc.), or where the container placement could be mistaken for a drug stash or a bomb (especially in more urban park settings). Hiding caches in these areas are discouraged and it is up to cache owners to use discretion when proposing a cache location and then to report any problems to the Chief Park Ranger immediately.

Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority Geocaching Guidelines- April 2011-----------------------

I. Purpose: Geocaching, letterboxing, and other similar activities are allowed in many NVRPA parks. Guidelines have been established to assure good stewardship of the natural and cultural resources in the parks.
II. Definitions from Wikipedia the Free Encyclopedia:
a. Geocaching is an outdoor treasure-hunting game in which participants (called “geocachers”) use a Global Positioning System receiver or other navigational techniques to hide and seek containers (called “geocaches” or “caches”) anywhere in the world. A typical cache is a small waterproof container containing a logbook and “treasure” (usually toys or trinkets of little monetary value). Variations of geocaching are Earthcaching, Cache-In Trash Out, Event Caching, and others.
b. Letterboxing is an outdoor hobby that combines elements of orienteering, art and puzzle solving. Letterboxers hide small, weatherproof boxes in publicly-accessible places and distribute clues to finding the pox in printed catalogs, on websites, or by word of mouth. Individual letterboxes usually contain a logbook and a rubber stamp. Finders make ain imprint of the the letterbox’s stamp on their personal log book, and leave an impression of their personal stamp on the letterbox’s logbook- as proof of having found the box.
III. Guidelines: Geocaches may be placed in any park area with prior approval and as long as they adhere to the following guidelines. As with any activity on parkland, the NVRPA reserves the right to place reasonable restrictions on the time, manner or place in which an activity is conducted.
a. Requests to place a geocache, letterbox, etc. on NVRPA property must be done in writing to the appropriate Park Manager. Please visit our website http://www.nvrpa.org for a complete list of parks and manager’s e-mail addresses. All requests must include:
i. The name, address, and phone number of the cache owner;
ii. The e-mail address of the cache owner;
iii. The exact proposed location of the cache to include: coordinates and a physical description (photographs are helpful) of the location (may require on-site visit with Park Manager to show location, as needed);
iv. The web address of where the cache will be advertised;
v. The expected length of time the cache will remain in the park;
b. Geocaches shall only be located in developed park areas that have existing uses, trails, and established access points. Geocaches shall not be placed more than 25 feet away from a maintained trail or developed park area;
c. Developed areas may include parking lots, roadways, athletic fields, picnic areas, etc.
d. Established/maintained trails are considered either asphalt, concrete, gravel, mulch, or park established trails. Casual or wildlife trails are not considered maintained trails.
e. The intent of this guideline is to protect the park’s natural and cultural resources. Trails are a disturbance in natural ecosystems. Any additional disturbance by going off trail can increase the dispersal of invasive plants, cause damage to underlying vegetation, and disturb wildlife. From the protection of cultural and natural resources perspective, the NVRPA does not generally authorize people to go off trail.
f. Geocaches shall be a minimum of 50’ from private property. It is the responsibility of the geocacher to be aware of property boundaries
g. Geocache locations must be accessible from a safe and legal parking location. If not readily evident, cache owners should include recommended parking directions on their cache pages.
h. The movement of already downed leaves, twigs, and pieces of bark to conceal geocaches is allowed. The NVRPA prohibits the movement of rocks, removing bark, and/or relocating a living plant. It is prohibited to excavate soils, cut vegetation, move or remove archaeological or natural objects (including living plants, animals, minerals, fungi, artifacts or features, etc.).Human-made objects of non-archaeological significance (e.g. a plastic water bottle) are considered trash and may be removed without prior notice or permission from the NVRPA.
i. Geocaches shall not be attached to any living or non-living natural resources in such a way that there is any possible damage to the resource. Loosely attached containers that do not restrict growth or cause damage to the resource may be used. Any attachments such as string, twine, wire, or tie wraps that cinch tightly to the resource are prohibited.
j. Geocaches shall not be attached to any man-made park amenities in such a manner as to damage the object or to impede its proper usage. The physical placement or attachment of caches to any buildings, sheds, or signs is prohibited. The use of data imprinted on the signs as offsets for coordinates is allowed. Alteration of the sign in any way is prohibited.
k. All geocaches must be marked as such on the container; Surplus ammunition cans are prohibited.
l. Geocachers must abide by all NVRPA rules, regulations, and other restrictions. This specifically includes park access times. Unless posted otherwise, all NVRPA parks are open from dawn to dusk. Night caching in NVRPA parks is expressly forbidden. Cache owners should include wording stating the acceptable caching hours in their cache pages.
m. Caches shall only be placed in safe locations not unduly causing patron risk. Geocachers must review the topography of the location where the cache is to be placed and the potential safety risks to the patron trying to find the cache.
n. Geocachers must strive to cause no damage to the grounds or vegetation that may result from cache searchers accessing the location. If damage is noted, the geocacher must contact the NVRPA for further information.
o. As with all activities on park land, the geocacher assumes some risk in undertaking their activity. The NVRPA is in no way responsible for any damage to or loss of caches or equipment that is caused by others. The NVRPA reserves the right to have cache owners or NVRPA staff remove any non-compliant caches. The NVRPA will remove and dispose of all unauthorized caches if unable to contact the owner of the cache to remove it themselves.
p. Caches placed on NVRPA land without written permission prior to May 2011 are subject to review and may be removed if they are found to be non-compliant with NVRPA guidelines.

Quote
Posted : 23/08/2010 11:05 am
(@mcgmarauders)
Active Member

Does anyone know if there are published guidelines/regulations for placing caches in Loudoun County Parks? Is there a form to be used for prior authorization and, if so, to whom should it be submitted.

Thanks! 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 03/05/2020 4:40 pm
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